Free Consultations *

TOLL FREE: 866-679-2513
KEW GARDENS: 718-577-2573
WOODBURY: 516-681-0250
TO ALL OUR VALUED CLIENTS
We continue to be here for you as we monitor the current COVID-19 health crisis. Futterman, Sirotkin & Seinfeld remains open. Our staff is working remotely and the firm will continue to be functional and operational.

You can reach all of us via email or leave a message on our phone extensions and we will return the calls as quickly as possible.
We are concerned about the health and safety of all of our clients and wish all of you the best during these difficult times.

contact now
Over 60 Years In Queens County
Medical
Malpractice Arrow
Pesonal
Injury Arrow
Real
Estate Arrow
Estate /
Probate Arrow

Being prepared for your surgery to reduce errors

| Apr 28, 2018 | Surgical Errors

If you have just received word that you need to get surgery, chances are you have begun to feel the storm of emotions that often accompany such news. While it would be convenient to rely on the preparation, knowledge and vigilance of your surgeon to provide the highest quality care, the risks of surgical errors are always present. At Futterman, Sirotkin & Seinfeld, LLP, we have helped many people in New York to learn about how their preparation can better protect them from costly errors. 

As soon as you find out that you will be needing surgery, one of the first things you should do is to find a reputable surgeon who specializes in operating on the area of the body that you need surgery on. Do not be afraid to ask people you know for recommendations, peruse online reviews and even visit potential surgical facilities to meet the staff. According to Web MD, some of the other things you can do include the following:

  • Research your surgery and understand what will happen. Ask your surgeon to explain the purpose of your surgery and what problems it should help to fix or prevent.
  • Understand that hospitals are places where germs can be easily spread. Do not be afraid to ask your attending doctor or nurses to thoroughly wash their hands before operating on you. 
  • Be aware of your options for anesthesia. Perhaps there are some that you are more comfortable with than others. 
  • Ask your doctor to clearly mark an “X” where the surgery is going to take place on your body. This will reduce the chance that you are the victim of wrong-site surgery.

By following these suggestions as you prepare to undergo surgery, you can better protect yourself from the risks of doctor error. For more information about medical malpractice, visit our web page. 

Archives

Need Answers? Contact Us for a Free Consultation

FindLaw Network